Oct 15

New Commission by Mo Laudi

Mo Laudi. Photo: Jo Zhou.

Join us with Paris-based South African multidisciplinary artist and DJ Mo Laudi for the launch of a new sound art piece inspired by the practice of photographer George Hallett (1942 - 2020) whose work was exhibited at the BiC Project Space (Casablanca) in February 2020.

This new commission takes the relationships between Hallett's life, photography and South African jazz in exile as a departure point. Through archives, original composition, field recordings and memories, the work questions the idea of displacement, mobility, and their implications on political, mental, spiritual and emotional levels. Mo Laudi also draws parallels with his own self-imposed exile, having left South Africa to live in London then Paris.

Mo Laudi will introduce this new work in conversation with Christine Eyene.

Thursday 15 October, 7.30 to 8.30 pm (GMT+1)

About the artist

Multidisciplinary artist, composer and producer Mo Laudi proposes new perspectives in the field of sound installations. Informed by his South African roots, he is renowned for his key contributions to Afro-Electronic music in London during the first decade of the millennium and, since then, in Paris. Mo Laudi experiments with sound as material. He creates sonic landscapes, mixing vocals, textures and rhythms, with his core knowledge and experience of video, fashion, dance, design and music as a socio-political critique of society.

His work addresses such topics as race, the postcolonial, mobility and erasure. It deals with spirituality, African knowledge systems, Afrofuturism to form new pathways of understanding multiplicities of cultures. Initially influenced by the art of Gerard Sekoto, Ernest Mancoba, Pablo Picasso and Jean-Michel Basquiat, as well as by the omnipresence of music and dance at home and in the streets of Polokwane, Mo Laudi stays tuned to South Africa and Africa in general, while absorbing countless different approaches and encounters to form his own language.

 

BiC Digital is developed by Biennale Internationale de Casablanca in collaboration with Making Histories Visible an interdisciplinary art project based at the University of Central Lancashire (UCLan).